A modern Achilles: The savings glut and the paradox of capitalist development

I would like to consider a paradox. On the one hand, prices are driven by demand for the product, and thus for the expenditure of savings from the income of labour. On the other hand, prices are shaped by the accumulation of savings which are diverted from ordinary spending to extraordinary spending on financial commodities. … Continue reading A modern Achilles: The savings glut and the paradox of capitalist development

The Playlist Episode 1 Review: The Spotify Music Network Is Not All It Seems. Is it?

Netflix has been busy. As the Crown is on the cusp of release to investigate the career of Diana Spencer, deceased ex-wife of Charles III, the new Carolingian age is anticipated by another TV series which echoes the brilliance of the 2010s series The Social Network, starring Jesse Eisenberg as the young Mark Zuckerberg, who … Continue reading The Playlist Episode 1 Review: The Spotify Music Network Is Not All It Seems. Is it?

Neumann’s ‘Behemoth’ and the rebirth of totalitarian-monopoly capitalism

Franz Neumann published one of the earliest books on the totalitarian state, entitled Behemoth. It is a startling representation of the divided state of Nazi Germany, one that challenges established conventions on totalitarianism. According to conventional interpretations both then and now, totalitarianism represents a singular entity, a powerful state echoing the ‘reall Unitie’ of Hobbes’ … Continue reading Neumann’s ‘Behemoth’ and the rebirth of totalitarian-monopoly capitalism

The evolution of political positions

In order to grasp the concept of the evolution of political ideas, let me consider a concrete case. The accelerationist case, from University of Cambridge. I was a centrist Liberal Democrat in my school years. Then I studied philosophy largely on my own, and became a left-wing Labour supporter in my undergraduate years, studying politics. … Continue reading The evolution of political positions

Why the left is so divided

First published on 23rd June 2022. What does it mean to be ‘left-wing’? Nowadays, buzzwords like ‘oppression’ and ‘inequality’ have replaced the old left-wing theories of ‘exploitation’ and ‘alienation’. Contrary to right-wing mantra, Marxism is out of fashion on the left — who on the left seriously reads Capital and cites the labour theory of … Continue reading Why the left is so divided

My predictions in 2022 and how they’re doing

I’ve made a few predictions about politics and music this year. Let’s see how they’re doing. Andromeda. That Liz Truss probably wouldn’t become British PM — completely wrong; my domestic political skills are found wanting — though I did note the Party was swinging towards Truss’ position. I never calculated how far. Lesson: Never underestimate … Continue reading My predictions in 2022 and how they’re doing

The balance of power and the pull of extremes

I would like to discuss, as I have many times before, the importance of balance in the context of political action. It is a decisive tendency in contemporary politics to swing towards one extreme or another, without really breaking out of the broad-based ‘neoliberal’ paradigm in which we live. Any vote seems eventually to produce … Continue reading The balance of power and the pull of extremes

What Liz Truss is really doing

Rishi Sunak is plainly the obvious choice for successor to Boris Johnson as leader of the Conservative Party and, by implication, the United Kingdom — sometimes described, not entirely inaccurately (albeit forgivably imprecisely), as a one-party democracy. But he has a surprise contender — Liz Truss, favourite among Party members but not the best sell … Continue reading What Liz Truss is really doing