‘Dice’ by NMIXX Music Review: Jazz-infused pop fusion — Worldwide Wambop comes of age

The ‘Korean wave’ is easily confused by westerners with the better-known phrase ‘Mexican wave’. But despite its dance focus, the Korean wave has an abstract connotation: the globalisation of Korean ‘culture’, especially the revolution that is K-Pop, popularised in the West by PSY’s Gangnam Style, inaugurating the YouTube age of pop music. Now with the … Continue reading ‘Dice’ by NMIXX Music Review: Jazz-infused pop fusion — Worldwide Wambop comes of age

Stravinsky, Jacob Collier, and the return of the 1920s in modern music

I go in circles with music. I love music so much and have great respect for all musicians. I approach politics and philosophy similarly, and am inclined to view politicians and philosophers in a similarly sympathetic light (however difficult this may, admittedly, sometimes be!). It is easy to critique things that shine. Once I much … Continue reading Stravinsky, Jacob Collier, and the return of the 1920s in modern music

The old ends so that the new can begin: Why Jacob Collier has absolutely no idea what he’s talking about

A lot of people like Jacob Collier, not because they like his music, but because they think he’s an intelligent person. This makes no logical sense. Think about it: if Jacob Collier really were the ‘second coming of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’, to condense the review of Collier in the New York Times and countless other … Continue reading The old ends so that the new can begin: Why Jacob Collier has absolutely no idea what he’s talking about

Still K-West: Did Kanye make Dr. Dre’s career, too?

Kanye West has been congratulated, occasionally by himself, for making musicians’ careers. Pop producer mastermind Jon Bellion (who recently made one of the most compelling K-Pop songs of all time, Rosé’s ‘On the Ground’) owes his career to Kanye’s music. Kanye himself claims to have made Taylor’s reputation and inspired her music, which all of … Continue reading Still K-West: Did Kanye make Dr. Dre’s career, too?

How music survived: The turn from romanticism to jazz

Modern music began with J. S. Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier, which laid the foundations for a new harmonic structure of overlapping melodies to replace the medieval unison chorus, and Renaissance eclecticism. Bach took folk tunes and made them the ‘themes’ of his new architecture. After Bach’s ‘baroque era’ of the early eighteenth century, Mozart developed the … Continue reading How music survived: The turn from romanticism to jazz

The sin of shame and the power of norms

A lot of people like talking about morality these days, and I wonder why. On the one hand, this is a very immoral world, where there is much suffering and pain, to no particular end. On the other hand, there are worse possible worlds in recent history which outstrip in some order of magnitude the … Continue reading The sin of shame and the power of norms

From Bach to Born: A philosophy of music

Recently I’ve been writing about music. The study of music from a philosophical perspective is often ridiculed, as it is traced to the work of critical theorist Theodor Adorno, who preferred Bach and Beethoven to Mozart and jazz music (preferring not to comment on the decrepit condition of popular music). Adorno played the piano, but … Continue reading From Bach to Born: A philosophy of music