Crown by Eric Gales: Blues but for the grace of Bach

‘Is this the beginning or the end of time?’ — Jimi Hendrix. Eric Gales is back with a blues record to compete with contentions to foundation of a new genre of music, along the lines of Bach’s foundation of classical music in the baroque period. The opening track of Gales’ record ‘Death of Me’ echoes … Continue reading Crown by Eric Gales: Blues but for the grace of Bach

Stravinsky, Jacob Collier, and the return of the 1920s in modern music

I go in circles with music. I love music so much and have great respect for all musicians. I approach politics and philosophy similarly, and am inclined to view politicians and philosophers in a similarly sympathetic light (however difficult this may, admittedly, sometimes be!). It is easy to critique things that shine. Once I much … Continue reading Stravinsky, Jacob Collier, and the return of the 1920s in modern music

How music survived: The turn from romanticism to jazz

Modern music began with J. S. Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier, which laid the foundations for a new harmonic structure of overlapping melodies to replace the medieval unison chorus, and Renaissance eclecticism. Bach took folk tunes and made them the ‘themes’ of his new architecture. After Bach’s ‘baroque era’ of the early eighteenth century, Mozart developed the … Continue reading How music survived: The turn from romanticism to jazz

The evolution of music and the importance of balance

Music, as I’ve recently argued on this blog, swings from one extreme to another. On the one hand, there are the technicians, who think music can be learned through meticulous practice. The chief virtue of technicians is the demand for perfection. On the other hand, there are the artists, who think music comes from innate … Continue reading The evolution of music and the importance of balance